I Wrote a Faster Sorting Algorithm

These days it’s a pretty bold claim if you say that you invented a sorting algorithm that’s 30% faster than state of the art. Unfortunately I have to make a far bolder claim: I wrote a sorting algorithm that’s twice as fast as std::sort for many inputs. And except when I specifically construct cases that hit my worst case, it is never slower than std::sort. (and even when I hit those worst cases, I detect them and automatically fall back to std::sort)

Why is that an unfortunate claim? Because I’ll probably have a hard time convincing you that I did speed up sorting by a factor of two. But this should turn out to be quite a lengthy blog post, and all the code is open source for you to try out on whatever your domain is. So I might either convince you with lots of arguments and measurements, or you can just try the algorithm yourself.

Following up from my last blog post, this is of course a version of radix sort. Meaning its complexity is lower than O(n log n). I made two contributions:

  1. I optimized the inner loop of in-place radix sort. I started off with the Wikipedia implementation of American Flag Sort and made some non-obvious improvements. This makes radix sort much faster than std::sort, even for a relatively small collections. (starting at 128 elements)
  2. I generalized in-place radix sort to work on arbitrary sized ints, floats, tuples, structs, vectors, arrays, strings etc. I can sort anything that is reachable with random access operators like operator[] or std::get. If you have custom structs, you just have to provide a function that can extract the key that you want to sort on. This is a trivial function which is less complicated than the comparison operator that you would have to write for std::sort.

If you just want to try the algorithm, jump ahead to the section “Source Code and Usage.”

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