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Tag: sherwood_map

plalloc: A simple stateful allocator for node based containers

Allocators in C++ are awkward classes. Allocators are usually zero size to make the containers small, and they have no state because that used to be difficult to do in C++. But nowadays we don’t really care about the size of our containers (we care about the size of the content of the containers) and since C++11 we have support for stateful allocators.

The problem I’m trying to solve is that node based containers have bad cache behavior because they allocate all over the place. So I wrote a small allocator which gives out memory from a contiguous block. It speeds up std::map and std::unordered_map. It’s called plalloc because I think this is a pool allocator.

Code is below:

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I Wrote a Faster Hash Table

edit: turns out you can get an even faster hash table by using this allocator with boost::multi_index. I now recommend that solution over the hash table from the post below. But anyway here is the original post:

This is a follow up post to “I Wrote a Fast Hash Table.

And I’ll start off with a download link.

I’ve spent some time optimizing my sherwood_map implementation and now it is faster than boost::unordered_map and boost::multi_index. Which is what I would have expected from my first implementation, but it turns out that those containers are pretty damn fast.

If you don’t know what Robin Hood Linear Probing is I would encourage you to read the previous post and the post that I linked to from that one. With that said let’s talk about details.

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I Wrote a Fast Hash Table

As others have pointed out, Robin Hood Hashing should be your default hash table implementation. Unfortunately I couldn’t find a hashtable on the internet that uses robin hood hashing while offering a STL-style interface. I know that some people don’t like the STL but I’ve found that those people tend to write poorer interfaces. So I learn from that by not trying to invent my own interface. You can use this hash table as a replacement for std::unordered_map and you will get a speedup in most cases.

In order to reduce name conflicts I call it sherwood_map, because Robin Hood Hashing.

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